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Subject: Re: The greatest singers who never appeared at the Met
From: Rich Lowenthal <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Rich Lowenthal <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Tue, 9 Oct 2018 12:47:55 +0000
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Well, Pavarotti also made a lot of opera fans happy. I have seen other 
performers as wooden as Pavarotti on stage, but they did not have the 
benefit of his absolutely gorgeous voice. His late career was at times 
an embarrassment, but his early voice was a golden age one. (And keep in 
mind that many of the early singers we celebrate were also "stand-up and 
sing" performers.)

As far as movie stars on the opera stage, it's a shame Nelson Eddy never 
sang at the Met. I don't know how his voice would have sounded in the 
theater, but he was really an opera singer with a movie career. (Of 
course, he did sing at the Met, in the guise of a whale...)

------ Original Message ------
From: "Les Mitnick" <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: 10/8/2018 11:09:25 PM
Subject: Re: The greatest singers who never appeared at the Met

>Tom:
>I'll run for cover with you and Idia.  Pavarotti was the worst opera 
>stage performer of his time.  He sang, albeit with a gorgeous voice 
>(for a good while before he became a cash-cow for Herbert Breslin) in a 
>stand-up-and-sing fashion.  He had absolutely no ability to create a 
>character, could not move on stage, and eventually became a media 
>clown.
>    Ironically, Mario Lanza never wanted an opera career anyway. He sang 
>a couple of Pinkertons in 1948 and that was it.  MGM scooped him up and 
>the rest is history. He made a few films (which were pleasant enough, 
>along with "The Great Caruso", which was highly fictionalized), got 
>fat, got thin, behaved like a pig, and was dead at the age of 38. 
>Strangely enough, he developed a friendship with Licia Albanese while 
>they did an Otello sequence in the film "Serenade".  She told him that 
>his singing needed polish and refinement, but he told her that he 
>really was more interested in singing songs than going through the 
>rigors of learning complete operatic roles.
>    I don't think Lanza would have been an especially effective opera 
>performer.  But make no mistake: he made a lot of people happy, 
>introduced a lot of young people to opera via his films and recordings, 
>etc.
>He also had great raw material that he was never able to hone and 
>refine.

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