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Subject: Re: the real final night at the old Met 1966
From: donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Fri, 8 Jun 2018 20:30:00 -0400
Content-Type:text/plain
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You must have been reading fiction.  There were no "supporting pillars", the
basic structure of the building was a five story horseshoe of three foot
thick
solid masonry.  I was able to observe the demolition day by day for the very
long months it took; it was no tumble down shack..  All roofs, that many
years
ago, would have been necessarily constructed of light weight material,
meaning
wood, which would have to be replaced, but to admit that now, does not
justify,
in retrospect, any such visions of calamity as I have seen today.

I agree with the Donald (Levine), who has posted a level-headed and informed
assessment of how the situation might have or could have been resolved.  It
is
not necessarily the case that the Old Met had to go in order for the new one
to thrive.  In my opinion, it was a mistake to try to make the new opera
house
bigger and grander than the old, instead, something more modern, less
expensive,
and adaptable to smaller, as well as to innovative productions should have
been
considered, with the older venue reserved for traditional staging.  New
York is a
much bigger city than so many in Europe that have always found room for
more
a single opera house.

dtmk.


On Fri, Jun 8, 2018 at 4:41 PM, R Stuart <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I read somewhere that when they razed the old house, it was discovered
> that
> many large supporting pillars that should have been solid were instead
> loosely filled with rubble. The place was in a state such that it could
> have
> collapsed at any time , and was more likely to do so when the house was
> full.
> I don't know if, even now, it would be possible to repair that kind of
> structural
> defect.
>
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