LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 15.5

Help for OPERA-L Archives


OPERA-L Archives

OPERA-L Archives


View:

Next Message | Previous Message
Next in Topic | Previous in Topic
Next by Same Author | Previous by Same Author
Chronologically | Most Recent First
Proportional Font | Monospaced Font

Options:

Join or Leave OPERA-L
Reply | Post New Message
Search Archives


Subject: Re: Early Gwyneth Jones
From: Bob Rideout <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Bob Rideout <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Fri, 2 Mar 2018 21:16:26 +0000
Content-Type:text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
Parts/Attachments

text/plain (114 lines)


The day after her San Francisco Isolde was broadcast in NYC,
a good friend called me and asked "Did you hear that?".
I responded that I had, indeed, to which he replied " I was driving
on the BQE,and it was so frightening that I had to pull over. I was
afraid I'd have an accident".

It was all of that and not much better when I saw it at the Met, but
she had some wonderful performances as well. I heard her in
excellent shape as Salome, Tosca and the Aegyptische Helena
in Vienna, and as a thrilling Fidelio, as well.

Her early Trovatore at Covent Garden 64? promised great things
and her first few recordings for London/Decca showed a very
impressive voice under great control. She was generally hailed
as the next great Verdi soprano. Little did we know! ;-)

I do consider that as a totality, her Bayreuth Brunnhilde in the
Boulez/Chereau Ring was the greatest combination of voice and
visual insight I have ever seen in those roles. Her physical beauty
helped, but that was only a piece of it. She was no joke!

And God knows she lasted forever!

Bob

On Fri, Mar 2, 2018 at 15:54 Maxwell Paley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> She’d been wobble prone well before 1978 and, in fact, in 1978 she sang a
> Fidelio in which her pitch was like a drunk driver’s adherence to lane
> markings.
>
> But she was great and there was something thrilling in every performance.
> You just never knew from night to night what you’d get.
>
> A couple of weeks after that wayward Fidelio I saw her do what might be
> just about the best Tosca I ever experienced. Full, steady, in total
> control with high notes that gleamed like floodlights. A bit like Crespin
> in size and impact but much easier and more controlled.
>
> In one performance of Tannhaüser in which she sang both lead female roles,
> the Venus was flutter and wow. After the break, her Elisabeth was pretty
> flawless: steady, clean, awesome control of dynamics.
>
> Her intonation in her first SF Isoldes had a tendency, as MB brilliantly
> put it, “to make familiar passages sound unfamiliar.” A few years later, I
> saw her sing it under Colin Davis with Vickers in London and it was near
> perfect. Amazing.
>
> Strauss brought out her best. I was told that her Salome was unlistenable
> but when I went to see it I was absolutely stunned. The eroticism, the
> power, the appearance of youth and the voluptuousness. That laser beam F#
> after the kiss, “Was tut’s?” Unforgettable. Her Marschallin and Dyer’s Wife
> likewise extraordinary experiences.
>
> Max Paley
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 2, 2018, at 12:25, David Kubiak <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > First, so there are no polemics over the fact, I think Gwyneth Jones was
> > (is) an extraordinary artist.  This is a purely technical question.  I
> just
> > discovered the final duet from 'Poppea' with Vickers in 1978 and could
> > hardly believe she was the singer.  How did she go from the ability to
> sing
> > like that so quickly to the wobble-problems that even her most ardent
> > admirers have to acknowledge (as I believe she did herself)?
> >
> > David Kubiak
> >
> > **********************************************
> > OPERA-L on Facebook:
> > http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
> >
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
> > containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
> >
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
> > [log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L
> NOMAIL
> >
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
> >
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> **********************************************
> OPERA-L on Facebook:
> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
> containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
> [log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L NOMAIL
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>

**********************************************
OPERA-L on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
[log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L NOMAIL
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Back to: Top of Message | Previous Page | Main OPERA-L Page

Permalink



LISTSERV.BCCLS.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager