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Subject: Re: Tunings
From: donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Mon, 19 Feb 2018 14:33:11 -0500
Content-Type:text/plain
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text/plain (147 lines)


"Aida is not about the high C"

We should all be required to write that down a hundred
times so we never forget it. But what do I know; I like
the high E.

dtmk

On Mon, Feb 19, 2018 at 3:18 AM, Takis Pavl. <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  It is   a b s o l u t e l y  true. There is a very informative video of
> Cappuccilli (and Tebaldi on the panel) demonstrating the effects of a
> higher pitch to a singer's instrument and vocal emission. Cappuccilli never
> had trouble with high notes and his voice lasted for ever so why would he
> have any reason to advocate for a lower (Verdi) pitch? Even a quarter of a
> tone makes a difference in our vocal technique. As Cappuccilli explains,
> Verdi knew about voices and wanted to use a certain colour, for baritones
> in his case. If you make a singer stretch his passaggio too often during a
> performance, the voice will get tired sooner and the chords will lose their
> ability to recover and keep their focus especially in the lower area.
>
> I'm no Cappuccilli but a professional musican (singer) and I have no doubt
> that 440 or higher tuning is not appropriate for works of the 19th century
> (even of the early 20th century). Now if certain lighter singers such as
> Mado Robin enjoyed raising their scenes a tone or more higher, that's
> because they wanted to demonstrate what their higher placed voices could do
> or how pretty their high voices were, not how the roles were written.
> In Baroque times pitch often had to do with the tuning of the city's
> church organ. Hence some Bach cantatas feel too low or too high if you sing
> them in modern pitch. Having sung a lot of Bach, I know most singers are
> petrified when they don't sing with period instruments because modern
> instruments pitched half a tone higher make some already difficult Bach
> passages a trial. Having to sing those a few times during daily rehearsals
> in modern pitch and often having to perform the piece on the same day
> (saving venue booking costs for the ensemble) means your voice is stretched
> beyond its limits. And after all that stretch on the top, the low and
> middle suffers. Also some string instruments (tuned in 440) will tune
> slightly higher before the concert, thinking that the tuning might drop in
> a warm hall. It doesn't matter if the singers protest, if it's choosing
> between a stretched singer or an out of tune orchestra, the orchestra will
> prefer to stay in tune and not consider the singer.
>
> Now you may wonder, why don't they use a higher voice that has no trouble
> with those passages instead? All the interpretative tricks a singer can do,
> don't make up for a certain vocal colour that matches the piece. The chosen
> tonality also has a meaning. Yes, you can ask Edita Gruberova, Diana Damrau
> and Mariella Devia to sing Aida, they can pop out the high C any time. But
> Aida is not about the high C. If you don't get that, there's no point
> discussing this any further.
> Takis
>
>
>
>
>     On Sunday, 18 February 2018, 23:18:45 EET, Kiwi <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>  That was the contention, that over time the turning has been raised to the
> benefit of the orchestra and the detriment of the singer.
>
> And also it led to bigger orchestras because the brighter sound needed more
> support.
>
> I think (I don't have the article in front of me at the moment) that writer
> says if you, as a singer, are singing with an orchestra tuned to 435 or
> 432,
> the sound production is easier and more fluid / flexible, producing a more
> even and less stressed sound.
>
> ????  Is there at least some validity to the point that a lower tuning
> allows most singers to have (for lack of a better sense) a richer, more
> easier sounding emission?
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bella Malis
> Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2018 3:36 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Tunings
>
> Just to help a little, as a former tuner.....etc. albeit a short term one.
>
> A 440, per min. Or sec.  I can’t remember which.....just means that there
> are 440 beats each time the A is sounded...that is the third A, up from the
> bottom of the piano.  Over the years, SOMEBODY decided to brighten the
> tones
> by raising of the tuning of the instruments.  All the instruments raised
> and
> the voices too.
>
> Makes for a brighter tone.....who knows which tuning should be done....
> A440....A 435, etc., etc.
>
> ***Bella
>
> Sent from my iPad
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