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Subject: Re: Met Parsifal Prima: Welcome to Monsalvat
From: Shirley Moyer <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:[log in to unmask]
Date:Tue, 6 Feb 2018 17:01:01 -0500
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Yes I got the Emergency warning too. Everything else great. But I am not a Vogt fan and did not particularly like his contribution. 

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 6, 2018, at 4:34 PM, Jon Goldberg <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> I was wondering if anyone else got the EBS interruption as well - since no one else had 
> mentioned it. That was awful. 
> 
> However, I didn't get any other interruptions - the ending of the opera was intact. 
> 
> I've been tending to listen to the Met only on the Sirius stream rather than the Met's 
> "listen live" option, because I've experienced a lot of dropouts on that stream. But, as far 
> as I know, the Met's stream isn't taken from Sirius, so maybe the "listen live" internet 
> audience was luckier last night. 
> 
> But I agree with the praises for last night's performance. Wagner is not my first love, and 
> I'm not as well-versed in Parsifal as many of you are. But I enjoyed having a night to be 
> at home and relax on my couch, vocal score in hand, listening to the beauty of it all, and 
> getting another chance to get more familiar with this opera. I picked a winner, lol. 
> 
> 
> On Tue, 6 Feb 2018 15:16:06 -0500, G. Paul Padillo <[log in to unmask]> 
> wrote:
> 
>> I had some difficulty tuning in last night and, there were several glitches on 
>> Sirius including an infuriating “This is a test of the Emergency Broadcast 
>> System . . . “ a few minutes into one of Gurnemanz’s 3rd act monologues 
>> and worse – Sirius dropping out during Parsifal’s final line and receiving 
>> the “content not available” message before Mahler began playing from 
>> another Sirius channel.  Even these, however couldn’t (fully) spoil the 
>> effect that was being made over the air, and, based on good evidence, 
>> emanating from the house itself.  
>> 
>> Yannick Nézet-Séguin led what can only be described as an extraordinary 
>> reading of an extraordinary score and his love for this score was made 
>> palpable in its execution.  Moments, like some of those orchestral 
>> interludes during Gurnemanz’s monologues that change its tone which 
>> many others either gloss or languish over, here crackled with life, a 
>> vibrancy in the strings that was electric.  
>> 
>> The first transformation scene went about as beautifully as Furtwangler, 
>> with a similar sense of moving forward and at Gurnemanz’s response (my 
>> favorite line from any opera) to Parsifal’s observation:
>> 
>> "Du siehst, mein Sohn,
>> zum Raum wird hier die Zeit!"
>> 
>> We were all along for that journey.  Here was shape and form, expansive 
>> where it needed to be, then firm . . . taut with a momentum like some 
>> great galactic force pulling each of us, inexorably, into its core.  I was, as I 
>> always want to be by Parsifal, overwhelmed and transported.  
>> 
>> That same care and detail, without being over precious was to be heard 
>> also in the Good Friday music, every measure part of the journey.
>> 
>> In the title role Klaus Florian Vogt will not likely be to the liking of some 
>> (most?) of our listers here.  My first encounter with him – about ten years 
>> ago – found me perplexed . . . the tone that, I thought, of a countertenor.  
>> After a few years I’ve come to love his interpretations of both Parsifal and 
>> Lohengrin.  Vogt began his musical career as a horn player with the 
>> Philharmoniker Hamburg and played in the pit for Parsifal.  There is a 
>> purity of tone – almost treble like – in his singing that I feel works 
>> wonderfully in this role paired against both Frau Herlitzius and Herr Pape 
>> brought an interesting aural tapestry, all the richer for its inclusion of light.  
>> 
>> Making her company debut, Evelyn Herlitzius offered a wonderfully drawn 
>> Kundry.  Bolder than many, more wild than some in her delivery.  When 
>> she wanted sleep, you just know that no one in the world has ever been 
>> more exhausted than this lady.  She took interesting liberties with her 
>> laugh at Klingsor – beginning it earlier and lasting longer and 
>> less “measured” than one is generally accustomed to.  She was sensational 
>> and different than my other favorite Kundries who offered more plush to 
>> their sound (think Ludwig, Troyanos, et. al.) and more in the Modl and 
>> Meier vein.  
>> 
>> Of Klingsor, all one can say of Evgeny Nikitin is that he sings the role as 
>> though born to it.  Too often for my taste has Klingsor had a wiry sound, 
>> more “Merlin the Magician” not enough menace.  Not so Nikitin who roars 
>> through the part like a beautiful, sexy howling beast.  
>> 
>> His Blumenmädchen sounded sexier than usual, girly and wild (“Girls Gone 
>> Wild,” I remarked to friends last night on FB).  They definitely didn’t sound 
>> like middle-aged matrons in caftans beckoning a hefty tenor in boy’s 
>> clothing.  There was definite “snap” going on in their sound which somehow 
>> managed to be both luscious and lean.  Delightful.
>> 
>> When Peter Mattei first took on Amfortas everyone  (including me) thought 
>> why?  Well, he showed us all why when this production first appeared here, 
>> and, as though we could possibly forget, reminded us again last night.  The 
>> elegiac quality of his suffering is exquisitely portrayed, the sound, focused, 
>> unforced, open with a raw beauty so exposed it almost feels “raw.”  
>> 
>> Rene Pape has, from the beginning, been one of the most beautifully sung, 
>> sonorous Gurnemanz in my experience.  He belongs up there with the best 
>> interpreters of the role.  While at this stage of the game a singer could just 
>> offer what he knows would “sell” – Pape goes beyond this.  One can hear 
>> some age in his voice, softening the old knight’s sternness, and, if at all 
>> possible, deepening the intensity, whilst balancing it with gentleness.  
>> Nowhere was this more evident than in the Good Friday music, where he 
>> evokes nature itself and spins out such tenderness in:
>> 
>> "Nun freut sich alle Kreatur 
>> auf des Erlösers holder Spur, 
>> will sein Gebet ihm weihen."
>> 
>> Just his mere utterance of “Kreatur” is a model of exquisite word painting. 
>> 
>> Everything about this performance lifted my heart up last night, made me 
>> glad to be alive right now regardless of what else is happening in this crazy 
>> world.  For six hours last night we had the opportunity to be lost in the 
>> time space continuum on our way to Monsalvat.  
>> 
>> I can hardly wait to experience this live in a few weeks – and that, friends, 
>> is an understatement.
>> 
>> p.
>> 
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