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Subject: Re: E tardi: Spoken or sung? Spoken
From: Jon Goldberg <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Jon Goldberg <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Sat, 13 Jan 2018 23:02:04 -0500
Content-Type:text/plain
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text/plain (62 lines)


For "a te, la mala Pasqua," the phrase is notated with pitches (F-flat and E-flat), but also 
with the directions "a piacere," "quasi parlando," and "Nel colmo dell'ira" (at the height of 
anger). Obviously this can be left to interpretation, though I certainly agree that 
speaking/yelling the line is a very plausible and dramatic effect. 

The final spoken line of the opera ("Hanno ammazzato compare Turiddu") is written in 
rhythm, but without noteheads, signifying it should be spoken. 



On Sat, 13 Jan 2018 15:13:34 -0600, Saunders, Harris S., Jr. <[log in to unmask]> 
wrote:

>The words "E tardi" (diacritics omitted) in _La traviata_ are indicated as
>spoken (there are no pitches or rhythmic durations indicated in the
>score), so singing these words is not an option sanctioned by the score. 
>The performance direction for the word "tardi" is "con voce sepolcrale."
>
>I do not have the score of _Cavalleria rusticana_ at hand, so I will not
>make any comment.
>
>Yours,
>--Harris Saunders
>
>
>Date:    Sat, 13 Jan 2018 13:49:58 -0500 From:    Myriam Hernandez
><[log in to unmask]> Subject: Phrases in Opera  There are certain
>phrases in Opera which are more effective if they are spoken instead of
>sung. Today's "A te, la mala Pascua," in Cavalleria, is one of those
>phrases. In my opinion, this curse sounds much more incendiary if it is
>shouted in a speaking voice. I have listened to many Santuzzas delivering
>this phrase, and most of them don't make the grade to my liking. Only
>Giulietta Simionato and Julia Varady, in her recording with Pavarotti,
>hurl out this curse in a speaking voice, to chilling effect. It's the same
>with "E tardi," in La Traviata. Spoken or sung? Which one has more effect
>over an audience?
>
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