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Subject: Re: Albert Innaurato -- "Purity of Heart" - A MESSAGE FROM NIEL
From: donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Thu, 19 Oct 2017 20:15:16 -0400
Content-Type:text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
Parts/Attachments

text/plain (140 lines)


I am pleased that Neil has taken the opportunity to post his adulation
of the late Albert Innaurato in its entirety.  The fact remains however,
that
if GCR had not provided an edited version to Opera-list, a valuable and
        thought provoking discussion might never have ensued.

dtmk


On Thu, Oct 19, 2017 at 6:11 PM, Takis Pavl. <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Niel Rishoi kindly asked me to forward the following message to the group:
>
> I was made aware that Genevieve Castle Room took my tribute to Albert
> Innaurato, and posted it to opera-l.
> This is what I wrote: "I wept when I heard the news. Albert… I had such
> affection for him, his generosity of spirit in sharing all that he knew
> about practically everything in the world, was rarely matched by anyone I
> have ever known, ever.
> But music! Music! He knew about it pretty much more than anyone I have
> ever read or known. He loved it, lived it, understood it, and made others
> understand it. It wasn’t just his great, genius, and deep musical sense you
> understood that he had, but his psychological grasp of the meanings,
> intents and purposes of even the most obscure compositions I don’t think
> many could equal within hailing distance of the level he did. His insights
> were beyond and above – again – than practically anyone I have ever known.
> I first got acquainted with him through an opera discussion group, and I
> read all of his contributions, enthralled, thrilled, and captivated. Often,
> what he wrote put me into this odd state of being deep in thought: he made
> you think on whatever he had written. Always there were revelations,
> providing me with new, and lasting impressions on many things I had never
> considered before. Brilliant, brilliant man, and that word hardly suffices.
> I began exchanging e mails with him. Mostly, to praise him. Some
> questions, which he always answered, wonderfully detailed. Always so kind
> to me, grateful I took the time to write to him. Offered me some advice
> from time to time; he understood too, the human condition.
> All too well!
> Albert was a tormented soul, one of those supreme geniuses who grasped
> everything perhaps too well, and found life difficult. He knew too well the
> pain of it. But it gave him that beautiful depth of knowledge. Yet I longed
> for him to have peace.
> His public skirmishes and feuds were well-known. He was often difficult,
> and could be hurtful and insulting. But you see, a lot of the geniuses
> throughout the ages had a difficult time in life, and were dissonant
> figures in society as a whole. They had dimensions and complexities unknown
> to the average person. Different ways of seeing things, different ways of
> thinking. Complacency, sweeping pronouncements and mediocrity of thought
> enraged him; and he was easily hurt. No one felt more deeply than he did.
> No one cared about things that were beautiful, and sacred – art – than he
> did.
> He created at times a great deal of enmity and downright hostility in
> online discussions. I never once joined in on these feuds. I cringed at
> what transpired, but I did not get involved. I regarded Albert as one of
> those kind of people you felt privileged to be privy to the kind of mind
> and insights he had. What he had to say was so much more valuable than the
> behaviors he exhibited from time to time. That is how it is with geniuses
> like him; something so exalting and out of this world he had in him, you
> didn’t want to miss anything he offered. Others chose to see the ugly,
> that’s their prerogative; I only saw the beauty of Albert.
> He was sort of the Brando of music.
> Other thoughts of him: the wickedest, most wonderfully salacious wit. The
> most colorful invective. Incapable of a dull, commonplace statement or
> thought. Disallowing of generalizations, fanatical hagiography, and the
> “common,” accepted, universal overviews; and when he explained why he
> dissented, he was often right. Eerie, bulls-eye observations on anything.
> Despite his cynicism and wariness, he could, I sensed, weep at things that
> were truly pure at heart, because in the center of his being, I think that
> is really what he had. No one who could love music as much as he did could
> be without purity of heart.
> Rest in peace, dear Albert. Thank you for all that I learned from you,
> your kindnesses to me, and for allowing me to know you, and most of all,
> for influencing me in so many profound ways."
> This is what Genevieve Castle Room Posted of what I wrote: "I wept when I
> heard the news. Albert… I had such affection for him, his generosity of
> spirit in sharing all that he knew about practically
> everything in the world, was rarely matched by anyone I have ever known,
> ever. But music! Music! He knew about it pretty much more than anyone I
> have ever read or known. He loved it, lived it, understood it, and made
> others understand it. It wasn’t just his great genius and deep musical
> sense you understood that he had, but his psychological grasp of the
> meanings, intents and purposes of even the most obscure compositions I
> don’t think many could equal within hailing distance of the level he did.
> His insights were beyond and above – again – than practically anyone I have
> ever known. I first got acquainted with him through an opera discussion
> group, and I read all of his contributions, enthralled, thrilled, and
> captivated. Often, what he wrote put me into this odd state of being deep
> in thought: he made you think on whatever he had written. Always there were
> revelations, providing me with new, and lasting impressions on many things
> I had never considered before. Brilliant, brilliant man, and that word
> hardly suffices. Albert was a tormented soul, one of those supreme geniuses
> who grasped everything perhaps too well, and found life difficult. He knew
> too well the pain of it. But it gave him that beautiful depth of knowledge.
> Yet I longed for him to have peace. A lot of the geniuses throughout the
> ages had a difficult time in life, and were dissonant figures in society as
> a whole. They had dimensions and complexities unknown to the average
> person. Different ways of seeing things, different ways of thinking. No one
> felt more deeply than he did. No one cared about things that were
> beautiful, and sacred – art – than he did. I regarded Albert as one of
> those kind of people you felt privileged to be privy to the kind of mind
> and insights he had. What he had to say was so much more valuable than the
> behaviors he exhibited from time to time. That is how it is with geniuses
> like him; something so exalting and out of this world he had in him, you
> didn’t want to miss anything he offered"
> So, as you can see, Genevieve Castle Room edited my tribute to suit as
> he/she wanted to present it, and me as "soft-headed." He/she left out the
> sections where I mentioned how difficult and insulting Albert could be.
> The volatility of Albert's personality has been duly noted on here, but I
> never had so much as a cross word with him in over 15 years of
> correspondence.However, this is a classic case of how quotes can be
> manipulated and twisted around to suit an agenda.
>  FYI Niel Rishoi
>
>
>
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