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Subject: Re: Albert Innaurato -- "Purity of Heart"
From: Stephen Charitan <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Stephen Charitan <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Wed, 18 Oct 2017 07:41:12 -0400
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Gee, its like he turned Albert into Alberdita Innauratova!

On Tue, Oct 17, 2017 at 11:10 PM, Genevieve Castle Room <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Niel Rishoi wrote:
>
> >"I wept when I heard the news. Albert… I had such affection for him, his
> generosity of spirit in sharing all that he knew about practically
> everything in the world, was rarely matched by anyone I have ever known,
> ever. But music! Music! He knew about it pretty much more than anyone I
> have ever read or known. He loved it, lived it, understood it, and made
> others understand it. It wasn’t just his great genius and deep musical
> sense you *understood* that he had, but his psychological grasp of the
> meanings, intents and purposes of even the most obscure compositions I
> don’t think many could equal within hailing distance of the level he did.
> His insights were beyond and above – again – than practically anyone I have
> ever known. I first got acquainted with him through an opera discussion
> group, and I read all of his contributions, enthralled, thrilled, and
> captivated. Often, what he wrote put me into this odd state of being deep
> in thought: he made you think on whatever he had written. Always there were
> revelations, providing me with new, and lasting impressions on many things
> I had never considered before. Brilliant, brilliant man, and that word
> hardly suffices. Albert was a tormented soul, one of those supreme geniuses
> who grasped everything perhaps too well, and found life difficult. He knew
> too well the pain of it. But it gave him that beautiful depth of knowledge.
> Yet I longed for him to have peace. A lot of the geniuses throughout the
> ages had a difficult time in life, and were dissonant figures in society as
> a whole. They had dimensions and complexities unknown to the average
> person. Different ways of seeing things, different ways of thinking. No one
> felt more deeply than he did. No one *cared* about things that were
> beautiful, and sacred – art – than he did. I regarded Albert as one of
> those kind of people you felt privileged to *be* privy to the kind of mind
> and insights he had. What he had to say was so much more valuable than the
> behaviors he exhibited from time to time. That is how it is with geniuses
> like him; something so exalting and out of this world he had in him, you
> didn’t want to miss anything he offered"
>
>
> This is sweet, but sort of soft-headed.
>
> Do you need to be reminded of the fact that some of the most immoral people
> and below-average intellects have possessed not only the finest and most
> sensitive musical faculties but the most exquisite musical taste? There is
> NO correlation between the faculty of musical appreciation or musical
> aptitude or musical affinity and “purity of heart". And there is no
> consensus about the relationship between musical understanding and
> practical musical competence among philosophers of music.
>
> I think what’s interesting is the (unexamined) idea of what it is to “love”
> music. Clearly for Mr. Rishoi this is different from either (a) liking
> music (i.e., getting deep and lasting pleasure from it); or (b) knowing a
> lot about music (being an expert, studying it). The idea that music can be
> a love object, which you could love with “purity of heart,” imagines it
> like another person, and imagines the relation as something in a romance
> novel..... Kind of adolescent, really.
>
>
> >"It wasn’t just Albert's great genius and deep musical sense you
> *understood* that he had, but his psychological grasp of the meanings,
> intents and purposes of even the most obscure compositions I don’t think
> many could equal within hailing distance of the level he did. His insights
> were beyond and above – again – than practically anyone I have ever known"
>
>
> Why do you think that any knowledge involved in (or presupposed by) musical
> understanding must be potentially exhibitable in the verbal arena? Why do
> you care so much about interpretation or description? Music consists of
> abstract, non-representational forms. The "meaning" of music resides in the
> intrinsic nature of the progressive forms themselves. And the more your
> attention becomes focused upon the "intents and purposes" of music
> (whatever that is), the less your chances of perceiving in an aesthetic
> manner.... There are admittedly different types of musical understanding
> but wouldn't you agree that the most interesting or valuable ones have to
> do with perceptually following the small-scale features of music and their
> segment-to-segment progressions?
>
>
> >"No one felt more deeply than he did. Albert was one of those supreme
> geniuses who grasped everything perhaps too well"
>
>
> And this sounds like hyperbole as a sort of eulogy for the deceased party.
>
> (I am very surprised that James Jorden "La Cieca" posted your tribute as a
> separate entry on his blog)
>
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