LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 15.5

Help for OPERA-L Archives


OPERA-L Archives

OPERA-L Archives


View:

Next Message | Previous Message
Next in Topic | Previous in Topic
Next by Same Author | Previous by Same Author
Chronologically | Most Recent First
Proportional Font | Monospaced Font

Options:

Join or Leave OPERA-L
Reply | Post New Message
Search Archives


Subject: Re: Helen Traubel: The loviiest Night of the Year
From: Bob Rideout <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Bob Rideout <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Mon, 28 Aug 2017 23:13:52 +0000
Content-Type:text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
Parts/Attachments

text/plain (205 lines)


Sorry, ladies and gents, I have no idea.

There are some pretty good radio transfers from as early as the
thirties - witness Ponselle in "Goodbye" from about 1935. It is truly
jaw dropping and the sound quality is remarkable. So, I would imagine
that a Trauble radio take from, say, the forties, could be in at least
decent
sound.

Bob

On Mon, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:54 Stephen Charitan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Don,
>
> Thank you for the Traubel Casta Diva - I would never even have thought to
> look!  Everything you say is right - she must have picked up her Eyetalian
> from the pizza waitress back in St. Louis and why even bother with the
> correct words or any sort of idiomatic delivery.  All of that being said,
> she is vocally magnificent - the voice light and  limpid in the first verse
> then she ever so slightly darkens the color for second iteration.  I was
> hoping she would make it through the light filigree between verses and
> indeed she does so with delicacy and elegance.  We don't get the cabaletta,
> but that is not a surprise...as an old professor of mine once said, "...in
> life we take what we can..."    However appropriate Fiedler might be for
> Sousa, he was not the ideal to coach such a glorious voice through the
> intricacies of Bellini.  A few sessions with the likes of a Serafin might
> have made this a classic "might have been..."
>
> Bob Rideout do you know the provenance of this recording?  The sound is
> almost too good for a radio transcription, but would a commercial release
> have contained so many verbal mishaps?
>
> Steve
>
> On Mon, Aug 28, 2017 at 1:40 PM, donald kane <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Things keep turning up; I had no ides there was a Traubel "All The
>> Things You Are"; I may have to break down and order the Sepia
>> disc.  "A Perfect Day" can't be missed either.
>>
>> Another lp that hasn't been mentioned was the fabulous Camden
>> compilation, which may be where "Merry Widow Waltz" comes
>> from, but also includes her earliest RCA opera arias, and one of the
>> best "Lost Chords" ever found.
>>
>> To make matters worse, thanks to You tube, I came across a nearly
>> 8 minute Casta Diva sung with perfect intonation, midwestern accented
>> Italian, and zero emotional involvement, but with Fiedler, again, credited
>> as conductor.  I can find no entries for any such thing in the RCA
>> catalog.
>>
>> It ain't over yet!
>>
>> dtmk
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 5:45 PM, Stephen Charitan <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Don,
>>>
>>> Agree with your assessment of Traubel in terms of the "American"
>>> pantheon.
>>> My first exposure to her was indelible - Katisha to Groucho's KoKo in a
>>> TV
>>> version of "The Mikado."  My long ago memories of this were reconfirmed
>>> when I watched the DVD reissue.  No Dragon Lady was ever more Dragon...
>>>
>>> I highly endorse the Sepia release of her Pop compilation entitled "The
>>> Loveliest Night of the Year" and again commend Bob Kosvosky for bringing
>>> it
>>> to the List's attention.  So many felicities and there is something about
>>> hearing such a sumptuous voice take on a waltz.  Witness the title song,
>>> as
>>> well as "Three o'clock in the Morning,"  "Its a Grand Night for singing,"
>>> " Missouri Waltz,"  "Beautiful Ohio,"  Merry Widow Waltz...."  That being
>>> said, the two I keep going back to are her renditions of "All the things
>>> you are" and "A Perfect Day"
>>>
>>> This release brings a buried treasure to light...if there is more, I
>>> can't
>>> wait to hear...
>>>
>>> Steve
>>>
>>> On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 9:01 PM, Donald Levine <[log in to unmask]>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> > Helen Traubel was plain and simple, one of the greatest voices of the
>>> > twentieth century and one of the handful of truly great American
>>> singers.
>>> > She had a rather strange career, mainly because of her nature - she
>>> first
>>> > auditioned for Gatti Casazza in 1926 but turned down an offered
>>> contract
>>> > because she felt herself unready.  She probably still felt herself
>>> unready
>>> > when she finally accepted a Met contract to star in Damrosch's Man
>>> Without
>>> > A Country.  Even her forays into Wagner seemed halfhearted.  She sort
>>> of
>>> > fell into it because of Flagstad's return to Europe and Marjorie
>>> Lawrence's
>>> > being struck down by polio.  She never received the respect she
>>> deserved.
>>> > And of course, there was the contretemps with Bing.  He had the
>>> notorious
>>> >  feud with Melchior and I don't think he was really interested in
>>> Traubel.
>>> > When Flagstad returned, part of her agreeing to come back was her
>>> respect
>>> > for Traubel and pointedly letting Bing know that she would not push
>>> Traubel
>>> > out.  They shared Ring Cycles and Flagstad did Fidelio and Traubel
>>> sang the
>>> > Marschallin.  Traubel herself was probably not interested in staying
>>> any
>>> > longer, she certainly went out of her way to piss Bing off.  I'm sure
>>> she
>>> > realized the top was continuing to disappear and in those days, star
>>> > dramatic soprano's didn't usually become mezzo's or contraltos.  Very
>>> few
>>> > went that route.  They usually retired.  In many ways, she was like
>>> Eileen
>>> > Farrell. Similar voice types, similar personalities.  Both immense
>>> natural
>>> > gifts.
>>> >
>>> > Donald
>>> >
>>> > On Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 5:02 PM, Stephen Charitan <
>>> [log in to unmask]>
>>> > wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> Call me an “easy” mark but Helen Traubel’s voice and manner in these
>>> >> popular songs is Drop Dead Gorgeous – I expected more of a “shot and
>>> beer”
>>> >> girl hiking up her skirts – but she never compromises the integrity
>>> and
>>> >> grandeur of her essential gift.  There is the occasional misjudgment –
>>> >> “Poor Butterfly ”  becomes “Mon Coeur s’ouvre a ta voix…”   but even
>>> in
>>> >> that case the voice is so opulent and the delivery so generous  you
>>> have
>>> >> no
>>> >> choice but to give in.
>>> >>
>>> >> **********************************************
>>> >> OPERA-L on Facebook:
>>> >> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
>>> >> ------------------------------------------------------------
>>> >> --------------
>>> >> To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
>>> >> containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
>>> >> ------------------------------------------------------------
>>> >> --------------
>>> >> To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
>>> >> [log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L
>>> >> NOMAIL
>>> >> ------------------------------------------------------------
>>> >> --------------
>>> >> Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
>>> >> ------------------------------------------------------------
>>> >> --------------
>>> >>
>>> >
>>> >
>>>
>>> **********************************************
>>> OPERA-L on Facebook:
>>> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
>>>
>>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
>>> containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
>>>
>>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
>>> [log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L
>>> NOMAIL
>>>
>>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
>>>
>>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>
>>
>>
>

**********************************************
OPERA-L on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
[log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L NOMAIL
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Back to: Top of Message | Previous Page | Main OPERA-L Page

Permalink



LISTSERV.BCCLS.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager