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Subject: Re: [Norton AntiSpam]Re: Kaufmann's Otello
From: Paul Ricchi <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Paul Ricchi <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Tue, 15 Aug 2017 00:36:40 +0000
Content-Type:text/plain
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...and Azucena models PTSD more than a century before psychiatry identified
the syndrome.

On Wed, Aug 9, 2017 at 2:40 PM G. Paul Padillo <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Mr. Kane wrote:
>
> "Well, at least you get my drift.  In travesties like MACBETH or IL
> TROVATORE, we just let the hilariously enjoyable music play out, but with
> OTELLO, Verdi takes the whole improbable thing much too seriously."
>
> * * * * *
>
> Verdi took “Otello”  –  one of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies – too
> seriously?  How else should he have treated it.  "MacBeth: and "Il
> Trovatore
> Trovatore", are travesties?  Maybe to some, but not to me, and millions of
> others who’ve loved these works.
>
> We limit ourselves and our capacity to fully appreciate works of art when
> we look at them only through a modern lens.  One needn’t look too far
> back in early American and European history to see that all of the plot
> devices, misunderstanding and incomprehensible horrors told in,
> say "Trovatore" would not only be believable to those earlier cultures, but
> seemingly well within the realm of possibilities to a good many.  This
> becomes especially true when considering a world dominated by religion,
> particularly a church which successfully kept the populace down on its
> heels through suffering, and ignorance lading to great misunderstandings
> of the unknown.  Toss in poverty, hunger, disease and illiteracy and
> you’ve go
> got a particularly unctuous stew.
>
> Stsicking with "Trovatore," we should remember Verdi’s partner was
> Cammarano, one of the most respected librettists in Italy, who provided
> Donizetto a number of great libretti for his major hits, e.g., “Lucia di
> Lammermoor,” “Roberto Devereux,” and “Poliuto.”  (He also co-wrote
> wrote “Luisa Miller”and “La battaglia di Legnano.”)  Verdi not only had
> great respect for Cammarano even listening to his musical suggestions.
> Tragically, Cammarano died after completing only two acts of "Trovatore's"
> libretto (talk about a curse!), whereupon Verdi hired Emanuele Bardare to
> complete the task.  In tribute to Cammarano, it was requested Bardare’s na
> name not appear anywhere on the printed score or in any of the opera's ad
> advertisements.
>
> A great man of the theatre, Cammarano was struck by Gutiérrez’ early
> 19th century play “El trovador” hailed by critics and public as a
> revelation
> and which enjoyed an enormous success in its day.  It's still considered
> among the first and greatest of “modern” works that commented upon the
> corrupt irrationalities of rival political and social factions who sought
> complete control of their world.  To up the dramatic ante (so to speak)
> it's
> also a harsh commentary upon the blind rage vendettas that needlessly
> took so many lives – something we can certainly see still exists in today’s
> world.  Of course, Verdi would look to Gutiérrez once again when he
> musicalized another of his plays, “Simon Boccanegra.”
>
> I wouldn’t expect all of us to agree, but for many . . . including
> conductors,
> singers and producers, it remains great, enthralling Verdi and, when given
> an inspired cast, a truly grand night at the opera.  Travesty, my eye!
>
> p.
>
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