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Subject: Re: Question about Callas Letter
From: "Takis Pavl." <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Takis Pavl.
Date:Sat, 24 Jun 2017 16:22:53 +0000
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"Plausible suspicions of gold-digging"?? haha. David, Callas' "affections" towards Meneghini are the very definition of gold-digging. But society didn't see women  as independent back then as now so Callas wasn't the only one looking for a rich Italian man to get work and some stability. She admitted being old-fashioned with regards to a woman's role. I wouldn't be surprised if she was somewhat attracted to Onassis for the same reasons.
Takis

      From: David Kubiak <[log in to unmask]>
 To: [log in to unmask] 
 Sent: Friday, 23 June 2017, 20:36
 Subject: Question about Callas Letter
   
I am reading the book 'Callas On Callas', which prints her early letters to
Meneghini, who evidently released them to defend himself against some rather
nasty things she was saying about him after she took up with Onassis. 
Neither of them comes off very well, I thought -- he looking almost
consciously indifferent to her in the pictures and she in the letters with
the over the top lovey-dovey prattle to a man his age making plausible
suspicions of gold-digging.  But the contents are fascinating.  There is one
letter she writes about the famous Mexico City 'Aida' that is both very
funny and contains an expression I am hoping someone can explain.  

She says:  "Baum is worse than a jealous woman.  He never stops insulting
me.  And he is furious because at the end of 'Aida' I achieved a sharp flat.
 The audience was delirious and he shook with rage."

In another letter she uses this same phrase "to sharp a flat', leading me to
think it must be an Italian idiom, but one which I have never read or heard
before.

Thanks for any help.

David Kubiak

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