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Subject: Re: tosca
From: Derek Lee <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Derek Lee <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:05:53 -0400
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Even A Katalin said there's no need to respond, I venture to do so in the
hope that someone more knowledgeable can clarify.

I think the illogicality occurred in the adoption process.

In the play the painting was first commented on in the first
meeting between Cavaradossi and Angelotti. It was mentioned in passing as a
transition devise from Angelotti's presence at the church to his
past trouble (both involved a woman). In the play, Cavaradossi and
Angelotti didn't know each other. Angelotti took a gamble in presenting
himself to Cavaradossi, presumably because he heard the long conversation
between the Sacristan and Gennarino (the painter's assistant) about
Cavaradossi's background and bet that he would be sympathetic. So in
that context, it makes sense that Cavaradossi didn't know who the woman
was. (He was a visitor to Rome and only stayed for Tosca.)

Both in the opera and the play, when Tosca confronted Cavaradossi about the
painting, he actually conceded that it was the Attavanti woman. Because by
that time in the play, he already knew the woman's identity. But in the
opera it contradicted itself because it eliminated the background scene. So
why did the librettists invent that first scene? My guess is that Puccini
wanted to write an "entrance" aria for Cavaradossi, using the two women as
contrast. And a mysterious woman is more intriguing. Also he didn't have to
explain who the woman was and presumably divert our  attention from Tosca.

At least that's how I see it.

Derek T



2017-04-21 18:09 GMT-04:00 A Katalin Mitchell <[log in to unmask]>:

> I am not sure I can sit through this… but will try.. on the other hand
> something that has bothered me every time I have seen Tosca, is how is it
> possible neither the Sacristan nor Cavaradossi, nor anyone associated with
> the church know the “ignota” who comes to pray, when she does it in the
> Cappella degli Attavanti, a family she belongs to?
> She would be seen there every single Sunday, how would at least the
> sacristan not know her?
> No need to reply, I just needed to vent… this is verismo after all, not
> Trovatore…
>
> And regarding Opolais, have your looked at the MET website lately? She is
> the cover… in a new role at the Met – Tosca!
>
> Kati
>
>

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