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Subject: Re: [Norton AntiSpam]Re: Puritani - today, from the Met
From: Les Mitnick <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Les Mitnick <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Sun, 19 Feb 2017 13:12:42 -0600
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Kiwi:
     THAT'S a good point.  Many successful recordings of Desdemona's big "scene" in Act IV of Otello have been made (as well as sung live) without the few lines from Emila.  In an aria like "Nessun Dorma", the orchestra plays the choral part, as it does during Violetta's big Act I finale from Traviata.  In "Puritani's "Son Vergine" in Act II, Elvira launches it but then it becomes an ensemble, yet Elvira get's the high E flat at the end.  This piece has been performed as a solo for soprano.  Therefore, I'd assume that it's an ensemble piece when performed in the opera, but an aria when performed by a soprano in a concert.
     Sometimes it gets a little sticky.  Turandot's "In Questa Reggia" is of course, an aria, but when performed in the opera, the ending is joined by the tenor after he repeats one of her lines.  As an aria, the orchestra performs that part and allows the soprano to take that thundering high C by herself.  Is the big aria "Mon Coeur" an aria for the mezzo, or is it a love duet beginning with the second portion of the second verse?  In the opera, it starts as an aria for Dalila and in the middle of the second verse, becomes a love duet for both Samson and Dalila.  In "Sonnambula, "Non credea" is an aria for Amina, but there are tenor intervals.  In the opera the intervals stand, but if the aria is sung as a soprano solo, the orchestra plays Elvino's lines.
     There are tons more examples, but I don't want to drive myself nuts.
> On February 19, 2017 at 10:54 AM Kiwi <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> 
> Nessun dorma?  There is an obvious interruption of Calaf's ruminations by 
> the chorus.  Does that mean it is an aria only when sung in concert (usually 
> without the extra voices) but not an aria when it is in a staged opera? 
> 
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