LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 15.5

Help for OPERA-L Archives


OPERA-L Archives

OPERA-L Archives


View:

Next Message | Previous Message
Next in Topic | Previous in Topic
Next by Same Author | Previous by Same Author
Chronologically | Most Recent First
Proportional Font | Monospaced Font

Options:

Join or Leave OPERA-L
Reply | Post New Message
Search Archives


Subject: Re: Salome
From: Michael McPherson <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Michael McPherson <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Sun, 18 Dec 2016 13:07:52 -0500
Content-Type:text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
Parts/Attachments

text/plain (156 lines)


I absolutely agree with you about Stratas. She was sensational 

Michael

Sent from my iPhone
Michael J. McPherson

> On Dec 18, 2016, at 10:39 AM, donald kane <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Ryan's "interpretation" is plausible, but Oscar Wilde's play which the
> libretto is based on, word for word, specifically aims Herod's command at
> Salome.
> 
> Vogue magazine, after her Met debut in the role, which I had attended,
> featured a full page, full color, full length photograph of Ljuba Welitch,
> with red hair and sparkling green robe against a bright full moon, and
> captioned "the great star of Salome".  Was she ever!  Matilla, in 2004
> was filmed in her sensational performance, the release of which Robert
> White had so often begged for, every time Sirius aired the less compelling
> later broadcast.   My very favorite though, is Teresa Stratas, who may
> never have been able to do vocal justice to Salome on stage, but wipes
> away all competition in a virtual personification of what both Strauss and
> Wilde had in mind.  With Varnay as Herodias, and the great Karl Bohm
> conducting the Vienna Philharmonic, it is a SALOME not to be missed.
> 
> dtmk
> 
>> On Sat, Dec 17, 2016 at 7:17 PM, Jon Goldberg <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> For me, that interpretation makes an even stronger case for the tenor to
>> sing the cadential
>> upward scale that Strauss actually wrote (on "-te dieses weib") instead of
>> avoiding the
>> pitches altogether. Screaming the line to me feels more like a loss of
>> control - singing
>> those last pitches could be more of a creepy "handoff" to Herodias, in the
>> below scenario.
>> (Followed by the outburst in the orchestra, which can represent the big
>> yell that Herod
>> decides to cap.)
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On Sat, 17 Dec 2016 17:52:02 -0500, Dennis Ryan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hi, Y'all!
>>>   I really rather liked the delivery of that last  line.  But then, I am
>>> in a distinct MINORITY about Herod's primary  motivation for delivering
>> it,
>>> even though there are other motives  clearly driving him as well.  Most
>>> people seem to believe that  Salome's kissing the lips of John the
>> Baptist's
>>> severed head is at last a  deed that even Herod finds to be beyond the
>> moral
>>> pale,  so that even HE is at last offended by the immorality that he has
>>> sanctioned and, indeed approved of and encouraged at his court.  I see
>> this as
>>> a lesser factor, here, just as his lust for Salome is less  a driving a
>>> force than another, more powerful one.  Given the  immoralities that have
>> been
>>> seen, heard, spoken, and done at Herod's court, not  only during the
>> course
>>> of the opera but during the history of his reign, and all  with his total
>>> approval, Herod would quite logically find "the kiss"  ironically
>> amusing, and
>>> would positively chortle his approval.  No matter  how he may "lust" after
>>> Salome, the love of Herod's life is Herodias.  This  "love" has always
>> been
>>> expressed through an intense love/hate  relationship that has run so deep
>>> that it has become a defining life experience  for both of them.  The
>> opera
>>> merely depicts the latest round in Herod's and  Herodias' years-long game
>> of
>>> "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," in which they  have been playing the
>> roles
>>> of George and Martha with great  enthusiasm--one-upmanship carried to the
>>> extreme.  In my imagination, I can  clearly visualize Herod, after
>> delivering
>>> that final line, turning to his wife  with the most lovingly vicious smirk
>>> that he can muster, and growling, "The ball  is now in your court, my
>> dear."
>>>   Cheers,
>>>   Dennis Ryan
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> In a message dated 12/17/2016 4:12:06 P.M. Central Standard Time,
>>> [log in to unmask] writes:
>>> 
>>> It does bother me when tenors "fake" too much of Herod - I'd say  today's
>>> tenor did pretty
>>> well with the role. I didn't like his yelling the  last line, though.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> **********************************************
>>> OPERA-L on Facebook:
>>> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
>>> -----------------------------------------------------------
>> ---------------
>>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
>>> containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
>>> -----------------------------------------------------------
>> ---------------
>>> To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
>>> [log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L
>> NOMAIL
>>> -----------------------------------------------------------
>> ---------------
>>> Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
>>> -----------------------------------------------------------
>> ---------------
>> 
>> **********************************************
>> OPERA-L on Facebook:
>> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
>> containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
>> [log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L NOMAIL
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> 
> 
> **********************************************
> OPERA-L on Facebook:
> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
> containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
> [log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L NOMAIL
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
**********************************************
OPERA-L on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
To UNSUBSCRIBE, send a message to [log in to unmask]
containing only the words:  SIGNOFF OPERA-L
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
To stay subscribed but TURN OFF mail, send a message to
[log in to unmask] containing only the words:  SET OPERA-L NOMAIL
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Modify your settings: http://listserv.bccls.org/archives/opera-l.html
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Back to: Top of Message | Previous Page | Main OPERA-L Page

Permalink



LISTSERV.BCCLS.ORG

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager