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Subject: Re: OPERA-L Digest - 26 Sep 2016 to 27 Sep 2016 - Special issue (#2016-987)
From: Peter Bloch <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:[log in to unmask]
Date:Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:19:30 -0400
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Who was the guy who was shot in act one of Tristan?

  Original Message  
From: OPERA-L automatic digest system
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 9:05 AM
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Reply To: Discussion of opera and related issues
Subject: OPERA-L Digest - 26 Sep 2016 to 27 Sep 2016 - Special issue (#2016-987)

There are 5 messages totalling 564 lines in this issue.

Topics in this special issue:

1. Melot (3)
2. "Tristan und Isolde" at the Met, opening night...Sept. 26, 2016
3. ARTISTS' EVENTS

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Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 00:30:30 -0400
From: donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Melot

His name is Neal Cooper, and it's his debut - poor guy doesn't even get to
deliver the mortal wound to Tristan, who simply stabs himself at the end of
Act Two! That does it for Wagner's idea of opening Acts One And Three with
a couple of scene setting, atmospheric tenor bits - what happens in this
misbegotten production is the elimination of the second role altogether -
no shepherd in Act Three! Be that as it may, I have always had a problem
with the Met's insistence on putting "off-stage" voices so far off stage
that they are just about inaudable; Brangaene, tonight, suffered this
practice the most: one
of this opera's supreme inspirations went for nothing, unless you're
impressed
by projected swirling clouds; .even the chorus lost most of the exciting
impact it should have as Act One closes. There is; as expected, no
curtain; will it survive this season? If I had to choose between
ascending clusters of crystal, and the great gold curtain - but why should
I have to choose? There's seldom much gained by substituting that big
black hole. Pretty good singing for
the most part, and a thrilling orchestral performance, otherwise, a mess.

dtmk


On Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 8:29 PM, David M. Wagner <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I'm liking the performance, but who's that ratchetty tenor Melot? Where
> are the great baritone Melots (Uhde, Weikl)? Or even first-class tenor
> Melots like William Lewis?
>
> And where are the commentators who understand this is an important
> character? No full cast was given after Act II - rather, everyone *but*
> Melot.
>
> Yes, in some of the medieval sources Melot is a dwarf, but Wagner did not
> go that route, and Melot should not sound like Mime, and a weak one at that.
>
> So who was he?
>
> -David Wagner
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 00:38:38 -0400
From: Kathy Boyce <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Melot

I'm sorry - but good singing, good orchestra, but no gold curtain? Really?

Kathy Boyce
New Hampshire

www.cafepress.com/operabayreuth

[log in to unmask]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
And the night shall be filled with music...... Longfellow

On 9/27/16, 12:30 AM, donald kane wrote:
> His name is Neal Cooper, and it's his debut - poor guy doesn't even get to
> deliver the mortal wound to Tristan, who simply stabs himself at the end of
> Act Two! That does it for Wagner's idea of opening Acts One And Three with
> a couple of scene setting, atmospheric tenor bits - what happens in this
> misbegotten production is the elimination of the second role altogether -
> no shepherd in Act Three! Be that as it may, I have always had a problem
> with the Met's insistence on putting "off-stage" voices so far off stage
> that they are just about inaudable; Brangaene, tonight, suffered this
> practice the most: one
> of this opera's supreme inspirations went for nothing, unless you're
> impressed
> by projected swirling clouds; .even the chorus lost most of the exciting
> impact it should have as Act One closes. There is; as expected, no
> curtain; will it survive this season? If I had to choose between
> ascending clusters of crystal, and the great gold curtain - but why should
> I have to choose? There's seldom much gained by substituting that big
> black hole. Pretty good singing for
> the most part, and a thrilling orchestral performance, otherwise, a mess.
>
> dtmk
>
>
> On Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 8:29 PM, David M. Wagner <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> I'm liking the performance, but who's that ratchetty tenor Melot? Where
>> are the great baritone Melots (Uhde, Weikl)? Or even first-class tenor
>> Melots like William Lewis?
>>
>> And where are the commentators who understand this is an important
>> character? No full cast was given after Act II - rather, everyone *but*
>> Melot.
>>
>> Yes, in some of the medieval sources Melot is a dwarf, but Wagner did not
>> go that route, and Melot should not sound like Mime, and a weak one at that.
>>
>> So who was he?
>>
>> -David Wagner
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> **********************************************
>> OPERA-L on Facebook:
>> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 01:30:33 -0400
From: David H Spence <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: "Tristan und Isolde" at the Met, opening night...Sept. 26, 2016

Listening to Acts One and Two and just catching the prelude to Act Three
(with fine English horn solo to follow) and the last three minutes of
Liebestod- my attention had been directed elsewhere, I felt a little
underwhelmed by just the audio of this. Leading exceptions to the rule w=
ere
Stemme, Gubanova, and Pape.
I preferred Stemme tonight during Act One to Voigt eight years ago under
Levine, that is, as a First Act Isolde. She has the text and music so
beautifully internalized, that regardless the conditions she might be
singing under or over really, she might as well have had Andreas Schager
opposite her as Tristan and Barenboim on the podium, instead of who showe=
d
up for this.=20=20

Rattle conducted a mostly fine prelude to Act One, but even there the
build-up of any excitement seemed to remain out on the surface. Remember=
ing
how beautifully Levine handled the same moment in Act One eight years ago=
,
Rattle with the entrance of Tristan to meet Isolde with getting his strin=
gs
to mash down to such an extent the phrasing was compromised, was mediocre=

here, as was the string playing to start Act Two. What is anyone to make =
of
it requiring only a mere seven minutes (plus a few seconds perhaps) to ma=
ke
it from the opening of the Love Scene (from the point that both singers
start in) to the extended, almost seemingly then over-extended 'O sink
hernieder' to begin, also featuring therein and over-miked sounding
Brangaene's Watch? This seems like not so much a cut, to remove such a
bleeding chunk, as a disfiguration.=20

Regardless, this Tristan from Rattle was certainly better than the very
portentous, excessively slow, soggy Pelleas he conducted from the Met, th=
at
almost sounded more like a stodgy take on Tristan than did this Tristan,
with his wife then, what it sounded like, the second-tier Isolde in
Debussy's Pelleas.And in this she could have had the second-tier Tristan =
of
Stuart Skelton to match. Skelton was fine this evening during the easier=

passages of the role, with a fine command of lyricism. The abridged
Liebesnacht however featured a fine share of quasi-Heppner-esque crooning=
,
snatching breaths, etc., but there was not a whole lot in the way of line=

with which Rattle supplied him anyway. Soos from principal double-reeds =
and
clarinets from the Met orchestra were consistently very fine.


Evgeny Nikitin I found servicable as Kurwenal, hardly anything more than
that and the Young Sailor to start Act One to be substandard. Rene Pape
delivered fine gravitas and expressivity to King Marke, but the pacing
together with him though to have been a little matter-of-fact,
look-at-the-watch perhaps.The best of this evening belonged to Stemme and=

Gubanova's scenes together, with Gubanova a very appealingly girlish
Brangaene, steady and warm in tone through the first scene of Act Two. On=
e
should however expect a little more vehemence to back Stemme for climaxes=
to
the Narrative and Curse from Act One than one had from Rattle.=20=20

What of the production? I haven't been able to see it yet, though I
remember being impressed with the Tchaikovsky/Bartok double-bill from two=

seasons ago, but mark my words, Tristan und Isolde is a much different
animal than any stage work by Tchaikovsky or Bartok or double-bill of bot=
h.
First of all, was there video commentary during the Prelude to Act One? =
I
think I ran across some insinuation somewhere to the effect there might h=
ave
been. I am reminded of reading about a Lohengrin from Berlin, in which
Barenboim was partnered by Stefan Herheim; Barenboim insisted that if the=

Prelude to Act One for it was to be staged, then his orchestra would have=
to
play it twice, the first time for his audience to listen to it first
un-distracted by any visuals.=20

I also heard this evening an emcee comment about the first half of Act Th=
ree
- a little boy on stage or on screen to represent Tristan? - and as such =
I
am thus reminded of the Peter Konwitschny production out of Munich, but
honestly now, could there have been intended any comparable irony to what=

went on in that? Mariusz Trelinski might have liked the idea, but had he=

picked it up from there at all, it seems to me he might have missed the
entire point of that production - as revealed during the last two pages o=
f
the Liebestod to end it all.

It would be good to hear more from Dan Kessler as to further assessment o=
f
what a good number of people saw tonight, Was there any way in which thi=
s
production succeeded and how specifically, with a few examples, did it
indeed prove too distracting? What proved too distracting back in 2008 w=
as
not the fine Dieter Dorn production, but the splitting up of the video
transmission into split-screen, four smaller boxes, and all that messing
around by somebody - the name an obvious one escapes me - on Met editing
staff. Thank you very much, Dan, in advance.


David Spence

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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:53:48 -0400
From: Bob Dilley <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: ARTISTS' EVENTS

Forsooth Opera Lovers!

Today we can celebrate the birthdays of:

Chris Merritt (1952)
Misha Dichter (1945)
Elizabeth Futral (196
Igor Kipnis (1930-2002)
Josephine Barstow (1940)

Also, Telemann's "Pimpinone" premiered on this date in 1725.

Let us remember Adelina Patti (1843-1919) and Englebert Humperdinck
(1854-1921) who joined Heaven's Choir on this date.

The quote for today is: "It=E2=80=99s fun to think about new possibilities.
I=E2=80=99ve always had a great time learning new roles, and I love the
challenge of creating a new character. I get bored doing the same five
roles over and over. This keeps me ticking, and I=E2=80=99m thrilled that n=
ew
things are opening up." Elizabeth Futral.

VINTAGE RADIO SHOWS DEBUTS: On this date in 1938 THE BOB HOPE RADIO
SHOW made it premier.

As always, a big HAPPY BIRTHDAY to our birthday artists for today and
all forum members who share their birthday with them.

ARTISTS' EVENTS salutes these artists for their enduring contributions
to the world of classical music.

ARTISTS' EVENTS honors the following Hall of Fame peerless artists for
their profound contributions to the world of opera:

Tenor of all tenors Enrico Caruso (25 February 1873-2 August 1921)
Coloratura prima donna assoluta Erna Berger (19 October 1900-14 June
1990)
Soprano prima donna assoluta Rosa Ponselle (22 January 1897-25 May
1981)
Prima contralto assoluta Fedora Barbieri (4 June 1920-4 March 2003)
Baritone unequaled Leonard Warren (21 April 1911-4 March 1960)
Basso profundo of all bassos Ezio Pinza (18 May 1892-9 May 1957)

In memory of the following first rate artists for September 2016:

Primo tenore Set Svanholm (2 Sep 1904-4 Oct 1964)
Coloratura stupenda Erika Koth (15 Sep 1927-28 Feb 1989)
Soprano prima donna Meta Seinemeyer (5 Sep 1895-19 Aug 1929)
Contralto assoluta Blanche Thebom (19 Sep 1915-23 Mar 2010)
Baritone unparalleled Pablo Elvira (24 Sep 1937-5 Feb 2000)
Basso profundo Nicolai Ghiaurov (13 Sep 1929-2 Jun 2004)
Distinguished virtuoso Alfred Cortot (26 Sep 1877-15 Jun 1962)
Preeminent conductor Eduard van Beinum (3 Sep 1901-13 Apr 1959)
Premier composer Arnold Schoenberg (13 Sep 1874-13 Jul 1951)
Featured premier Giaochino Rossini's "La Gazzetta" 26 Sep 1816

NON CLASSICAL RECORDINGS OF MERITORIOUS ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE:

"Mas Canciones," Linda Ronstadt
"Canciones de Mi Padre," Linda Ronstadt
"Jardin Azul: Las Canciones Favoritas," Linda Ronstadt
"Greatest Italian Songs," vol 1, Connie Francis
"Greatest Italian Songs," vol 2, Connie Francis
"Spanish and Latin American Favorites," Connie Francis
Bing Crosby: "White Christmas," with sales of over 100 MILLION copies.=20
Also, he was the best recording artist of the 20th century with over
half a BILLION records in circulation.

May ARTISTS' EVENTS put a smile on your face and a song in your heart
each day.

Pace e Gioia,

Bob Dilley
FIAT VOLUNTAS DEI
( May God's Will Be Done)


--=20
http://www.fastmail.com - The way an email service should be

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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2016 09:05:19 -0400
From: donald kane <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Melot

That's the way it is. Rattle should have rebelled; the Prelude says all
that needs to be said in anticipation of the opera's opening; the
projections add
nothing.

Actually there is a shepherd's tune, sung by no one in particular, (a boy
keeps
wandering about the stage all through the act, who is supposed to be the
young Tristan, adding to the confusion, not to mention a hallucinatory
"flashback" that,
seems to represents a glimpse of Tristan's boyhood home) but there's still
that off-stage vacuum swallowing up the debut of Alex Richardson who ought
to be heard, if not seen, singing the shepherd's tune.

I leave it to someone else to delineate all the infelicities of this
staging, but might mention the frequent directorial annoyance of placing an
important
singer performing one of a work's highlights so far to one side of the
stage that a good number of patrons are forced to bend forward in order to
see it - in this case the Liebestod! No excuse for that.

dtmk



dtmk

On Tue, Sep 27, 2016 at 12:38 AM, Kathy Boyce <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> I'm sorry - but good singing, good orchestra, but no gold curtain? Really?
>
> Kathy Boyce
> New Hampshire
>
> www.cafepress.com/operabayreuth
>
> [log in to unmask]
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> --------------------------
> And the night shall be filled with music...... Longfellow
>
>
> On 9/27/16, 12:30 AM, donald kane wrote:
>
>> His name is Neal Cooper, and it's his debut - poor guy doesn't even get to
>> deliver the mortal wound to Tristan, who simply stabs himself at the end
>> of
>> Act Two! That does it for Wagner's idea of opening Acts One And Three
>> with
>> a couple of scene setting, atmospheric tenor bits - what happens in this
>> misbegotten production is the elimination of the second role altogether -
>> no shepherd in Act Three! Be that as it may, I have always had a problem
>> with the Met's insistence on putting "off-stage" voices so far off stage
>> that they are just about inaudable; Brangaene, tonight, suffered this
>> practice the most: one
>> of this opera's supreme inspirations went for nothing, unless you're
>> impressed
>> by projected swirling clouds; .even the chorus lost most of the exciting
>> impact it should have as Act One closes. There is; as expected, no
>> curtain; will it survive this season? If I had to choose between
>> ascending clusters of crystal, and the great gold curtain - but why should
>> I have to choose? There's seldom much gained by substituting that big
>> black hole. Pretty good singing for
>> the most part, and a thrilling orchestral performance, otherwise, a mess.
>>
>> dtmk
>>
>>
>> On Mon, Sep 26, 2016 at 8:29 PM, David M. Wagner <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>> I'm liking the performance, but who's that ratchetty tenor Melot? Where
>>> are the great baritone Melots (Uhde, Weikl)? Or even first-class tenor
>>> Melots like William Lewis?
>>>
>>> And where are the commentators who understand this is an important
>>> character? No full cast was given after Act II - rather, everyone *but*
>>> Melot.
>>>
>>> Yes, in some of the medieval sources Melot is a dwarf, but Wagner did not
>>> go that route, and Melot should not sound like Mime, and a weak one at
>>> that.
>>>
>>> So who was he?
>>>
>>> -David Wagner
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> **********************************************
>>> OPERA-L on Facebook:
>>> http://www.facebook.com/groups/25703098721/
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------
>>> --------------
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>>
>

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End of OPERA-L Digest - 26 Sep 2016 to 27 Sep 2016 - Special issue (#2016-987)
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