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Subject: Re: Mozart's greatest scene?
From: Theresa Muir <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Theresa Muir <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Mon, 5 Apr 2010 13:38:35 -0400
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You and the nineteenth century!  

But Don G. is kind of a unique work, and an argument that the Enlightenment and Romantic ages were not as firmly differentiated as the 19th century liked to think.  They mingle in this work, as they mingle in the works of naturalist and polymath Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802, for a time THE Darwin), who wrote romantic poetry to explain the biological processes of plants-- and the Romantic poets, who wrote very clinical descriptions of plant life in their poems!

So while Don G. displays some elements that strongly appealed to arch-Romantics, like E.T.A. Hoffmann, it was still an 18th-century work, with what the 19th century would have considered an alarming lightness and cynicality about sex, essential to Da Ponte's work -- with even, to further complicate matters-- a look back to the religious sensibilities of a much earlier age. 

Theresa




    



-----Original Message-----
>From: Mark Bartelt <[log in to unmask]>
>Sent: Apr 5, 2010 1:19 PM
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: Mozart's greatest scene?
>
>Theresa Muir wrote ...
>
>>>  "Mozart's greatest scene" seems like a ripe topic for discussion
>
>Indeed ... if only because there are so many ways to define
>"greatest", i.e. "greatest" in what sense?
>
>For me, the one I'd consider greatest in the sense of "most
>emotionally gripping" is the one beginning "Don Giovanni, a
>cenar teco m'invitasti, e son venuto" up through the Don's
>final scream as he's dragged down.
>
>Personally, I sort of wish Mozart had ended the opera right
>there; I've always found the final scene a bit anticlimactic.
>
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Theresa Muir
[log in to unmask]
http://humanitas.blogspot.com

I'm not on Facebook ;)

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